More photos will be forthcoming; took a bunch of great photos during all the action yesterday, and when she has a moment to send them our way, i’ll get them posted.

First, the stunning baling-wire colors in the fire saturday night:

dispatching excess weeds:

Looking east, towards the house & the road, from the far side of the new bridge:

You can see the mulberry tree that and Kay trimmed, on the right. those pallets in the background are the compost pile, with a representative sampling of this year’s weed problem lurking behind it.

Here it is from the other side, looking west:

That was all ditch when we woke up yesterday. i don’t know about you, but i’m impressed. :)


and here’s a shot that shows the bridge-like nature of the bridge:

with the outflow that Bex built of rocks Matt provided, and the walls of rocks that we harvested in the east mountains last weekend. the rocks on the ditch bottom should help prevent a pond from forming right there.

meanwhile, some poles got cleaned up for coyote fencing, which we plan to build to run from the south corner of the house to the north corner of the greenhouse, for privacy in the back yard:

here’s where we took half our dirt clay from–the garden that was no more than a glimmer in my eye last week:

that yellow cord from the dryer vent is my really classy yurt electricity arrangement. the black pipe is the air vent for the laundry outflow, and i am going to replumb the laundry so we can use the greywater from it in this garden. this will be my perennials bed–medicinal herbs & ornamentals. grapes! a lilac! hollyhocks, sunflowers, yarrow, lemon balm, comfrey, dill, coriander, lavendar, osha, valerian, cota, feverfew, ephedra, blue sage, gaillardia, stevia, evening primrose, poppies!

yes. it’s a hole in the ground right now, but this spring it will be a large bed full of good dirt, waiting for all those plants and whatever else i find irresistable at Plants of the Southwest.

here’s another view:

no garden, or yurt, would be complete without a cat. that’s my beloved Tattersall, asking to be let back into the yurt. mornings are cold around here lately! for all the shade on the garden bed in these photos, it’s in full sun from a bit after noon onwards, and the sun-loving perennials should do very well there. it certainly was sunny enough to do in any number of enthusiastic diggers yesterday!

the rest of the clay for the bridge came from here:

Alan’s cold frame bed. and this bed is completely finished, now. it awaits a truckload of compost, which we’ll mix 3 to 1 with native soil, and fill up the hole, then we’ll build the cold frame around the edges. we’ve got old skylights to use for the coldframe, thanks to . The bed is about 4×8, and it’s 3′ deep, so we should finally be able to grow beets–the poor things should have enough root room to flourish! not to mention spinach, lettuces, kale, chard, orach, radishes, carrots! if we can get the frame built and everything into the ground by Oct 15, we should be in good shape.

and last but not least, our little “helper:”